NEWS

Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar
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The Buffalo News, June 22, 2017.
Books in Brief: ‘Lucky Broken Girl’ by Ruth Behar, ‘Exploring Space’ by Martin Jenkins
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5 Middle-Grade Books Perfect for Summer, June 16, 2017.
Curl up with your child and enjoy these warm-weather reads together!
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Girls of Summer
Lucky Broken Girl included in Girls of Summer List, 18 Books for Strong Girls
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Lucky Broken Girl Meet-the-Author Book Reading, June 16, 2017.
Ruth Behar introduces and shares some of the backstory for creating Lucky Broken Girl.
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Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar, June 14, 2017.
This was a beautifully written story!.
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Guest Blogger: Ruth Behar, June 12, 2017.
TeachingBooks.net is delighted to welcome author and cultural anthropologist Ruth Behar as our featured guest blogger this month..
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Una novela juvenil narra la experiencia del exilio cubano desde la perspectiva de los niños, May 25, 2017.
Inspirada por eventos de su niñez, la escritora y antropóloga Ruth Behar ha escrito “Lucky Broken Girl”, una novela para lectores jóvenes sobre la experiencia del exilio desde la perspectiva de los más chicos.
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Childhood accident inspired writer’s career and newest book, May 16, 2017.
Ruth Behar’s main character in “Lucky Broken Girl” spends a year in a body cast.
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Ruth Behar is the author of Lucky Broken Girl, a new middle grade novel about finding the inner and outer strength to move through life’s obstacles.
Ruth Behar on Being Broken and Finding Strength.
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Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar, May 5, 2017.
This novel has a ring of authenticity to it. I felt as if I was reading a memoir, probably because the author based the story on her own childhood.
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UM professor relives childhood accident, long recovery in YA novel, May 2, 2017.
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Five Family Favorites With Ruth Behar, author Of Lucky Broken Girl, April 30, 2017.
I read many books to my son Gabriel when he was a little boy. Read more…

Q&A with Ruth Behar, April 27, 2017.
Ruth Behar is the author of a new novel for older kids, Lucky Broken Girl Read more…

Lucky Broken Girl (review), April 24, 2017.
Easily the best thing about the book is the writing, it’s written in the voice of a young Ruth and it reads as if a child her age actually is writing it.
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The Chronicle of Higher Education, April 23, 2017.
Scholars Talk Writing: Ruth Behar Read more…

WGVU, April 20, 2017.
Michigan Author Ruth Behar joins TMS to discuss her book, ‘Lucky Broken Girl.’ Read more…

Starred Review
Books & Books, April 14, 2017.
When Ruthie Mizrahi moves from Cuba to Queens, N.Y., and starts fifth grade, she has two goals. Read more…

Barnes & Noble, April 12, 2017.
A Tale of Spirit in Ruth Behar’s Lucky Broken Girl. Read more…

Librarian’s Quest, April 3, 2017.
We all know what it’s like to start over. It may be a new grade level at the beginning of a year. Read more…

Miami Herald, March 15, 2017 (print version, March 30, 2017).
The assimilation of a Jewish Cuban girl to the U.S. and the recovery of the lost island. Read more…

Cuba Counterpoints.
Ruth Behar’s Lucky Broken Girl. A review by JULIE SCHWIETERT COLLAZO Read more…

El Nuevo Herald, March 10, 2017.
La integración de una niña cubanojudía a EEUU y la recuperación de la isla perdida. Read more…

LUCKY BROKEN GIRL, Feb. 22, 2017. 
Live Chat with Ruth Behar. We will begin our live online chat at 5 pm, Eastern with Ruth Behar the author of the novel Lucky Broken Girl, to be published by Nancy Paulsen Books on April 11, 2017.  Read more…

★ Starred Kirkus Review of Lucky Broken Girl
In the 1960s, Ruthie Mizrahi, a young Jewish Cuban immigrant to New York City, spends nearly a year observing her family and friends from her bed. Before the accident, Ruthie’s chief goals are to graduate out of the “dumb class” for remedial students, to convince her parents to buy her go-go boots, and to play hopscotch with other kids in her Queens apartment building. But after Papi’s Oldsmobile is involved in a fatal multicar collision, Ruthie’s leg is severely broken. Read more…

Publishers Weekly Review of Lucky Broken Girl
Set in 1966, this strongly sketched novel, adult author Behar’s first for children, focuses on a 10-year-old Cuban immigrant whose injury forces a prolonged convalescence and rehabilitation. The story begins with Ruthie Mizrahi moving up from the “dumb class” (where she learned English) to the “regular fifth grade class” at her school in New York City. Read more…

A review of Lucky Broken Girl by the writer Padma Venkatraman
The ARC of Ruth Behar’s debut novel, LUCKY BROKEN GIRL, carries quotes from three remarkable writers whose work I deeply admire: Sandra Cisneros (author of the classic THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET), Margarita Engle (Newbery Honor-Winning Author of THE SURRENDER TREE) and Marjorie Agosin (Acclaimed poet and Pura Belpré winning author of I LIVED ON BUTTERFLY HILL). Read more…

Ruth was an invited writer for WriteOnCon
an online writers’ conference focusing on children’s books, February 2-4, 2017.
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nerdyCover Reveal of Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar
I was delighted when I saw the stunning cover art that Penelope Dullaghan created for Lucky Broken Girl. Rather than depicting my protagonist—a young girl who is temporarily confined to her bed—the cover portrays the lush beauty of her imaginative world. Dreams and hopes literally burst forth from the apartment in which Ruthie is confined as she slowly heals and her spirit finds ways to soar and flourish.  Read more…

Penelope Dullaghan’s Bookcover, Lucky Broken Girl
The book is about 9-year-old Ruthie who gets into a car accident and breaks her leg so badly, she needs to wear a full-body cast for a year in order to heal. She gets depressed, being stuck indoors everyday, but has lots of multi-cultural neighbors and friends who help her through.

So my idea was to give an overall feel for Ruthie being stuck indoors, but surrounded by a flourishing neighborhood with people doing lots of things – biking, gardening, playing, reading. I wanted it to feel happy and bright as Ruthie is in the story, being surrounded by people who support her. I brought in flowers as a way to give a nod to her Cuban upbringing and to reference Ruthie’s growth and change throughout the story. Read more…