NEWS

★ Starred Kirkus Review of Lucky Broken Girl
In the 1960s, Ruthie Mizrahi, a young Jewish Cuban immigrant to New York City, spends nearly a year observing her family and friends from her bed. Before the accident, Ruthie’s chief goals are to graduate out of the “dumb class” for remedial students, to convince her parents to buy her go-go boots, and to play hopscotch with other kids in her Queens apartment building. But after Papi’s Oldsmobile is involved in a fatal multicar collision, Ruthie’s leg is severely broken. Read more…

A review of Lucky Broken Girl by the writer Padma Venkatraman
The ARC of Ruth Behar’s debut novel, LUCKY BROKEN GIRL, carries quotes from three remarkable writers whose work I deeply admire: Sandra Cisneros (author of the classic THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET), Margarita Engle (Newbery Honor-Winning Author of THE SURRENDER TREE) and Marjorie Agosin (Acclaimed poet and Pura Belpré winning author of I LIVED ON BUTTERFLY HILL). Read more…

Ruth was an invited writer for WriteOnCon
an online writers’ conference focusing on children’s books, February 2-4, 2017.
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nerdyCover Reveal of Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar
I was delighted when I saw the stunning cover art that Penelope Dullaghan created for Lucky Broken Girl. Rather than depicting my protagonist—a young girl who is temporarily confined to her bed—the cover portrays the lush beauty of her imaginative world. Dreams and hopes literally burst forth from the apartment in which Ruthie is confined as she slowly heals and her spirit finds ways to soar and flourish.  Read more…

Penelope Dullaghan’s Bookcover, Lucky Broken Girl
The book is about 9-year-old Ruthie who gets into a car accident and breaks her leg so badly, she needs to wear a full-body cast for a year in order to heal. She gets depressed, being stuck indoors everyday, but has lots of multi-cultural neighbors and friends who help her through.

So my idea was to give an overall feel for Ruthie being stuck indoors, but surrounded by a flourishing neighborhood with people doing lots of things – biking, gardening, playing, reading. I wanted it to feel happy and bright as Ruthie is in the story, being surrounded by people who support her. I brought in flowers as a way to give a nod to her Cuban upbringing and to reference Ruthie’s growth and change throughout the story. Read more…